A Delta Journey: West Monroe’s Antique Alley, Bayou Brew House, Moon Lake and Trapp’s on the River

West Monroe’s Trenton Street is one of the best places in the country to shop for antiques and ephemera. There’s not a whole lot with regards to music, as a certain man from Bastrop is a record collector and seller, and he routinely buys anything valuable he sees in the shops, but for old Louisiana books or Grambling State University ephemera, it is basically unbeatable. I spent about an hour browsing through the shops, while the city was setting up tables and chairs for some sort of evening event, and then I decided to head to the Bayou Brew House in Monroe for a cappuccino.

The Bayou Brew House had taken over the place on Desiard Street downtown where RoeLa Coffee Roasters had been, and I was hopeful that they still sold the RoeLa products, even though they had moved out by the Monroe airport. I was disappointed in that, but the coffee house proved to have a beautiful setting, in an old house under a number of trees, and the coffee options were awesome. Even better was learning that they sell breakfast, which is for some reason always a major challenge in Monroe.

With the sun going down, I decided to head out to Moon Lake, a resort and marina on an eponymous lake, north of Monroe and west of Highway 165. An article online said that the place featured amazing hamburgers and beautiful waterfront views, and it was a place I had never been. Unfortunately, when I arrived at the resort, I could find no trace of the restaurant. There were some people around, and some residents seemed to be barbecuing beside their RV’s and motor homes, but no crowds, or anything else to suggest a restaurant. Finally, I asked a man, who explained to me that the restaurant was closed due to the chilly weather, as all of its seating was on the open deck of a floating barge.

Disappointed, I made my way back into Monroe, and decided to head to Trapp’s, a place on the Ouachita River in West Monroe, where I had enjoyed a fried shrimp dinner a few years ago. The weather had been warm for the last several hours, and I made the mistake of choosing to sit out on the back deck overlooking the river and downtown Monroe. As the sun went down, it did not take long for the deck to become chilly indeed. But the food was as good as I had remembered it, and the place was crowded, inside and out.

After dinner, I headed to Grambling to spend some time with a friend, Dr. Reginald Owens, the journalism professor at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, who had formerly taught at Grambling. He was expecting a large number of relatives in town for the homecoming, and was getting things prepared. Down in the Village, Main Street was devoid of the people I would have expected to see during a homecoming in previous years. Perhaps the cold weather was keeping them away, but there was a bit more activity on the campus near the Quadrangle, where some young men seemed to be rapping on an outdoor stage. But there was no place to park, police were everywhere, and it was quite cold. So I headed back to my rental unit in West Monroe.

Great Seafood at Lusco’s in Greenwood

On my last visit to Greenwood, back in April, I had decided to try the Crystal Grill for dinner, and I was thrilled with my meal, one of the very best I had ever had. As a result, this visit, I resisted the temptation to go back to Crystal Grill, in order to try Lusco’s instead. The people at the Mississippi Mo Joe Coffee House had warned that I might not be able to get into either restaurant due to the bike race and the resulting extra crowds of people in town, but I called Lusco’s and was able to get a reservation at 8:30.

Lusco’s is a fairly nondescript, older building on Carrollton Avenue in a fairly rough neighborhood of Greenwood. It looks nothing like the elegant restaurant it is inside, but, like its competitor down the street, keeps a guard at the door, who escorts customers to their cars after dinner.

Inside, Lusco’s consists primarily of private booths with curtains that close, so each group of diners is generally dining in their own private space. As such it would be a great place to take a wife or girlfriend. It’s a very romantic concept indeed.

Compared to Crystal Grill, Lusco’s is somewhat more expensive, and has a somewhat more limited menu, but they have marked similarities, especially the prominence of seafood on both menus, which is fairly odd, considering that the Gulf of Mexico is at least five hours away. I opted for the broiled shrimp, with the famous Lusco’s shrimp sauce, and lump crab meat added on the top. It proved to be absolutely amazing. The shrimp sauce seems to involve at the very least butter and worcestershire sauce, and was savory and delicious. The shrimp and crab came with toast points to sop up the delectable sauce, and my waitress actually brought another whole basket of bread for me to enjoy the rest of the sauce. Unfortunately, the restaurant had run out of baked potatoes, but since the french fries were homemade and cut in house, I didn’t even mind. They too were delicious. Finally, I decided to end it all with a slice of chocolate amaretto cheesecake, which the waitress said was made in-house as well, and it was absolutely delicious.

So, how did they stack up? I would have to say that Lusco’s and Crystal Grill are just about tit for tat. Both are among the best and most memorable meals I have had anywhere, and both offer seafood far superior to anything I can currently get at home in Memphis. Greenwood is worth a visit for fine dining.

Lusco’s

722 Carrollton Avenue

Greenwood, MS 38930

(662) 453-5365

Open Wed-Sat 5-10 PM

Celebrating Dexter Burnside’s Birthday With Blues

Dexter Burnside is a son of the late R. L. Burnside, and was a drummer until health problems forced him to put down his sticks. But every July, along Mayes Road near Independence, Mississippi, his birthday party is celebrated with live blues from his brothers Duwayne, Garry and Joseph Burnside. It’s not necessarily open to the public, but people who know about it from the surrounding area come, and there were nearly a hundred people there this year, even a candidate for sheriff of Tate County, who made a brief speech to the crowd. Of course there was plenty of barbecue and catfish and plenty to drink. Picnics of this sort used to be the rule in the Hill Country during the summer months, but have sadly become rarer.

An After-Festival Dinner at Kelly Ray’s in Pocahontas

After Eric Deaton left the stage at Bentonia, I wanted something good to eat. Not just fast food. So I had seen a new restaurant on my phone’s Yelp app in the nearby town of Pocahontas, Mississippi called Kelly Ray’s Crawfish, Seafood & Steaks. Not only did it sound like my kind of food, but their Facebook profile showed a picture of what looked like an authentic blues band playing on their stage. I knew that some of the Hill Country blues musicians had played at a place in Pocahontas some years ago called T-Beaux’s, and I wasn’t sure if this was the same place under new ownership or what, but I decided that it would be a good choice. Fortunately R. L. Boyce and Sherena agreed, so we soon headed down Highway 49 in the darkness, past Flora and into Pocahontas.

We had a little trouble locating Kelly Ray’s, as the building still had a T-Beaux’s sign on the front, but we went inside and quickly learned that we were at the right place. Our waitress was in fact a blues fan, and had been at the Blue Front Cafe the night before. They had a small indoor stage, with just a folk singer/guitarist outside on the deck, and our waitress explained that they don’t book live music during the summer, but would start back booking blues in the fall. Soon, some other people that had been at the Bentonia festival also came into the establishment.

As for the food, it was great. Cajun seafood is the specialty, and although I considered getting a steak, I eventually opted for the fried shrimp instead, and it proved to be a great choice. My friends were happy with their meals as well, and we especially enjoyed the friendly, welcoming service at the end of a long, hot day.

Afterwards, with us being only 20 miles from Jackson, I decided it made more sense to go on down there and catch Interstate 220 back to 55, which proved to be far easier than the dark, 2-land road from Yazoo City to Pickens. We got back to North Mississippi with little difficulty.

Kelly Ray’s Crawfish, Seafood & Steaks

1052 Pocahontas Rd

Pocahontas, MS 39213

(601) 879-5582

The Maine Thing Is Lobster at Cousin’s

I must say that lobster is my favorite of all shellfish, despite my abiding love of shrimp. It’s merely the high cost of lobster that typically keeps me away. Of course, on the other hand, a true New England lobster roll is hard to come by hereabouts, and, given my hatred of mayonnaise, I was never particularly eager to try one anyway. However, when Cousin’s Maine Lobster food truck debuted in Memphis, I became aware that there is more than one kind of New England-style lobster roll, and once I read a description of the “Connecticut Roll,” lobster meat with drawn butter and lemon, served warmed on a roll, I knew I had to try one.

So, when I saw that Cousin’s was going to be posted up outside of the Mississippi Ale House in Olive Branch, I decided that this was my opportunity, as it was directly on my way to Holly Springs, where I was headed for the second evening of the Kimbrough Cotton Patch Soul Blues Festival.

What I hadn’t counted on was the line, nor the fact that it wasn’t moving much at all. Apparently the process of preparing lobster rolls is a slow one indeed. Nearly 30 minutes after I joined the line, I finally got to place my order, which I have to say was quite expensive. Of course it is lobster, but I was still shocked at the cost.

Was it worth it? Yes. I have had lobster tails, and loved them, but this was my first time having a Connecticut Roll, and it was absolutely delicious. There was plenty of good, succulent lobster meat on my sandwich, and the tater tots that I got as a side dish were equally delicious. Lobster roll, tots and drink came to $20, and I won’t be doing that very often, but it is very, very good indeed.

As Cousin’s (at least in Memphis) is a food truck, it has no fixed location. Visit their website, or follow them on Facebook to find where they will be each day. For a special treat, it is worth finding.

A Perfect Meal At One of America’s Oldest Restaurants

After two performances in Belzoni, I was thoroughly hungry and somewhat tired. Belzoni had only one sit-down restaurant as far as I could see, but it was closed, either due to the gridlock caused by the Catfish Festival, or perhaps closed for good. So I knew I would have to go elsewhere for dinner, and I had considered heading to Greenville, Indianola or Greenwood. Greenville was a little bit too far, and Indianola I had been to frequently, so I decided to head to Greenwood in order to try a place I had never eaten before.

Ultimately, I chose a 75-year-old restaurant called the Crystal Grill, located across from the main Amtrak railroad station in downtown Greenwood. The rain was coming down, and I almost feared that the place might be closing for the night. But fortunately, they were still open, and inside, there was a still a good-sized crowd of diners in the back dining rooms.

The atmosphere was bright and cheerful, and when I saw the menu, I was amazed at the various choices, and the relatively low prices. Ultimately, I chose a grilled redfish, with lump crab meat on top, and a baked potato with butter, bacon and cheese. Redfish is one of my favorite types of fish, and this one was so large, it nearly filled my plate. It was flaky, and delicious- the best I have had since I visited The Goode Company Texas Seafood in Houston many years ago. I had expected a normal baked potato with cheese, bacon and butter, but what I got was something quite different- the potato had been baked, then scooped out, and the butter, cheese and bacon had been mixed, then put back into the potato shells and baked again. It was quite delicious and I ate all of it.

Now thoroughly happy, I opted for the perfect finish- a slice of homemade cheesecake in a delicious graham cracker crust. When I left to go to my car, the doorman asked me how it was. I told him truthfully that I had just had one of the best meals of my life.

The Crystal Grill

423 Carrollton Av

Greenwood, MS 38930

(662) 453-6530

Coastal Cuisine at Cooper-Young’s Elwood’s Shells

Since the closure of Anderton’s Restaurant in Midtown some years ago, Memphis has had a noticeable lack of decent seafood restaurants, and several attempts at it in recent years have not fared well. Nevertheless, good seafood, especially Gulf seafood, is something that I always crave, so when I heard that the good folks at Elwood’s Shack had opened a new place called Elwood’s Shells which specializes in seafood, I had to try it.

Elwood’s Shells sits in an old house next door to Tsunami in the trendy Cooper-Young neighborhood, amidst a very small parking lot. With nearby lots restricted to other establishments, parking is the restaurant’s biggest challenge. But the space is attractive, its interior a riot of coastal and tropical colors, with folk art by local Memphis artist and musician Lamar Sorrento.

The menu is remarkably large, and fairly unique by Memphis standards. There is fried shrimp of course, but also croaker (a kind of fish), grouper and redfish. There are entrees prepared in both the pontchartrain and meuniere styles that visitors to New Orleans or Biloxi have learned to love, and there is also a selection of po-boys and sandwiches. On my first visit, I tried the fried shrimp, and found them delicious, although they were far larger than the medium gulf shrimp that one usually finds in Pensacola or Mobile. They had a delicious breading, and the french fries that accompanied them were equally delicious. A slice of key lime pie to follow was the perfect ending to the lunch. Service was fairly slow but cheerful.

Unfortunately, my one big disappointment was the price. Elwood’s Shells is relatively expensive, doubtless because of the cost of bringing in quality seafood from the Gulf of Mexico. The food is good, and probably worth the price, but I will have to reserve Elwood’s Shells for special occasions or times when I have extra money. But it certainly deserves a visit.

Elwood’s Shells

915 S Cooper St.

Memphis, TN 38104

(901) 552-4967

A Taste of The Gulf Coast In Somerville At Big Fish

Somerville, Tennessee is not exactly close to the Gulf of Mexico, and yet the new Big Fish restaurant at Highway 64 and Jernigan Drive effectively creates the ambiance of a waterfront seafood restaurant in Destin or Panama City Beach. The restaurant, built by an architecht around his formerly-mobile food truck, has only outdoor seating, but the dining area is covered with a sort of roof, and the whole area is attractively landscaped in a way that suggests the beach is not far away. On my first afternoon visit, great New Orleans music was playing over the loudspeakers. I had come with the intent of trying a shrimp po-boy, but I was soon intrigued by the special, a Surf ‘N Turf Burger. This proved to be a 100% Black Angus burger, topped with cheese, lobster, shrimp and crab. It would have normally been topped with cole slaw as well, but I am not a fan of cole slaw and asked them to omit it. As strange as the concept might sound, the Surf ‘N Turf burger was absolutely amazing, and a decent value at $8.99. It came with equally delicious french fries. The weather was pleasant, and at my table, it was easy to forget Highway 64 off to the north, or the shopping center across the street at my back. It felt like being in Florida. I finished off my meal with a slice of key lime pie, which was also delicious. I don’t think it is made in-house, but it is still really good. Unfortunately, on a more recent visit, the food was still amazingly good, but the owners told me that they will be closing at the end of October. With no indoor dining options, I had wondered how they would deal with the onset of cold weather, and what I learned is that they had decided to close altogether, during which time they will be renovating an old house on the premises. The project will result in an indoor dining area, and should be completed by April of 2019, at which time they plan to reopen. In the meanwhile, I strongly recommend that you get out to Big Fish for at least one last time here in October before they close for the winter.

Big Fish

30 Jernigan Dr

Somerville, TN 38068

(901) 650-2553

The Tennessee Delta V: Fayette County

On a Friday evening, after meeting a friend for dinner in Memphis, with nothing in particular to do, I headed out Poplar Avenue through Collierville and into Fayette County, which is the Tennessee county that most resembles the Mississippi Hill Country. Mississippi Fred McDowell was from Fayette County (Rossville to be exact), and if there is any fife and drum activity left in Tennessee (and there does not seem to be), it would likely be in that county. So I often venture out there to ride the backroads, take photographs, and see if I come upon any events, or flyers announcing events on the various stores along the roads. People in Fayette tend to be old-school and don’t use social media much to promote blues or gospel events. 

One of the reasons that this has taken on such urgency with me is that the western portion of Fayette County is undergoing a process of suburbanization, as people move away from Memphis into the country. The resulting growth and subdividing has the net effect of destroying historic locations and buildings, so I want to photograph what is still around while I can. 

Posters on the outside of stores in Rossville and Moscow announced a barbecue festival in Rossville and a car show in Somerville, as well as a Jubilee Hummingbirds concert at a church south of Moscow in Slayden, Mississippi. There was a also a poster announcing some kind of rap show at Saine’s, which is ordinarily a blues club. Signs along Highway 57 also announced that Terry Saine, the club’s owner, was running for the state legislature. 

Out on the Cowan Loop between Moscow and LaGrange, I came to an old and somewhat historic-looking church called Anderson Grove. The place, set far back off the road in a grove, looked almost abandoned, but the area was fairly peaceful. Further west along the same road was another church, obviously abandoned, with no sign to indicate what its name might have been. Not far away, back on Highway 57 was an abandoned grocery store that must have at one time been a bustling place indeed. But I found no evidence of juke joints, ball fields or picnic spots.

North of Moscow, along Highway 76, I came to Saine’s Blues Club, and stopped there, in the hopes of perhaps catching up with Terry Saine. Saine was a civil rights activist in the 1960’s, and in my belief likely old enough to have been aware of Black fife and drum bands in Fayette County during his youth, and perhaps also able to fill in some gaps about the Fayette County blues musician Lattie Murrell. But Saine was not there, perhaps out campaigning for office, so I headed on into Somerville. 

There, around the square, young people were setting up stages, booths and barricades, getting ready for the Cotton Festival, which was to be held the next day. Nothing was going on at the moment however, so I headed over to Betty’s After Dark blues club, but found it fairly quiet, although open. They were having a large T. K. Soul show the next night, after the Southern Heritage Classic game in Memphis. Nearby, however, was a restaurant with outdoor tables and colorful lights, that seemed to be packed with people. It  looked like something transported from Destin or Orange Beach to Somerville, and proved to be a new seafood restaurant called Big Fish that I realized will deserve a future visit. 

On out Highway 59, Fayette-Ware High School was clearly playing a football game at their stadium, but I wasn’t particularly interested in that, and I headed on to Brewer Road where I knew there was a club. But all I found was a group of young people at the end of the road on four-wheelers just hanging out, and if there was anything going on at the club, it was obviously a hip-hop event geared to youth.

Likewise at Mason, the Log Cabin and Blue Room had large crowds, but just DJ’s as best I could tell, and by now I was thoroughly tired. So I gave up looking for anything to get into and began driving back toward Bartlett on Highway 70, as lightning and rain began to develop. 

A Taste of the Gulf at Hernando’s Crossroads Seafood


Hernando’s new Crossroads Seafood is not exactly easy to find. It sits on Highway 51, near the Interstate 69 overpass between Hernando and Nesbit, and there is no exit on 69, although you can see the restaurant from the expressway. From Memphis, it’s best to exit at Nesbit and go over to Highway 51 and take a left. The restaurant will be on your right as soon as you pass under the interstate. But while finding Crossroads Seafood might take some extra effort, it’s worth the trouble, as this place has the best seafood in Desoto County, and some of the best in the entire Memphis area. From the road, the restaurant looks fairly small. There is a patio, with a few tables outside in the sun. But inside, the place seems bigger than it looks, comfortable and cool, with country music videos playing on the big screen televisions. The menu is fairly diverse, but despite steaks and burgers, the reason people come here is seafood, and for good reason. On my first visit, I tried the catfish dinner, which was as good as any I have had in North Mississippi. The dinner comes with two filets and two sides, for which I chose french fries and the homemade potato chips, the latter fried to a golden brown and still warm when they come out. On a subsequent visit, I tried the grilled redfish, which was reminiscent of one I loved at a Houston seafood restaurant, and at $13.99, a real bargain. It too came with two sides, and I chose french fries and macaroni and cheese. The the mac and cheese here had been baked, and seemed to have been made with sharp cheddar, which gave it a burst of flavor. My lady friend tried the catfish, and was thoroughly pleased. We ended our visit with a shared piece of caramel cheesecake, which while not made in-house, was still well-crafted and delicious. Crossroads meets a real need in Desoto County since the closure of Boiling Point several years ago, and will be seeing us again.

Crossroads Seafood
23 Highway 51 S
Hernando, MS 38632
(662) 469-9188